Macadami_kiwi_pie2
Pie, Recipe

Epic Vegan Kiwi Pineapple Macadamia Pie

 

Macadami_kiwi_pie1   Greetings Health Fans,

Feast your eyes on this beauty of a raw vegan pie. It’s often difficult for me to eat something that looks so beautiful but the only thing better than how it looks is how it tastes.

Macadami_kiwi_pie5Don’t take my word for it though. Make one yourself. The crust features macadamia nuts and dates. The bottom layer has cashews, coconut milk and maple syrup. The top whipped layer uses the meat from young Thai coconuts blended with coconut milk and more macadamias. A layer of kiwi separates the bottom layer from the whipped goodness on top. The good news is that this pie is cruelty free, dairy-free and gluten-free. Follow the recipe below to experience your very own high pie-brational bliss.

Macadami_kiwi_pie3

Kiwi Macadamia Pie / Cheese Cake

Crust Layer:
1/2 cup dates (8) – pitted
1 C macadamias
1 C almonds
1/4 cup coconut flakes (add last)
1/4 tsp salt

Combine ingredients in food processor. Add coconut at the end and pulse in. Press crust mixture into pie pan or spring form.

Cheese Cake Layer:
2 C cashews soaked
1/2 C date (8) – pitted
1/3 C lemon/lime juice
1/3 C maple syrup
1/2 tsp salt
2 tsp vanilla powder
1/4 C coconut oil (melted)
1/2 C nut milk ( almond or coconut)

Combine in blender. Pour into crust and allow to set in freezer for 3 hours. Once set, add a layer of cut fruit of your choice. Return to the freezer.

Whipped Topping:Macadami_kiwi_pie2
1 1/2 C coconut milk
1/2 C macadamias soaked
Meat of 3 Thai coconuts
2 tsp vanilla powder
1/2 C maple syrup
3 TB coconut oil – melted

2 TB lecithin
Combine ingredients in blender adding lecithin last. Pour whipped topping onto frozen pie. Tap pie on counter to remove air bubbles. Set in freezer for 3 hours. Once set, decorate with fruit slices.

Allow to thaw for 30 minutes before cutting and serving.

Watch the videos for step by step instruction.

 

blog, Raw Food Adventures

Pawpaw, paw paw, papaw… have you heard of it?

Coconut yoghurt and persimmon breakfast
Coconut yoghurt and persimmon breakfast

Winter has well established itself here in Michigan with snow on the ground and temperatures below freezing. It seems that only a week ago I was trekking through the Rawnora landscape in search of pawpaws. What’s a pawpaw you say? That’s a fair question to ask considering this native fruit is relatively new to me as well.

pawpaw_on_treePawpaw, Latin name asimina triloba, is the largest indigenous fruit in North America. The pear-sized fruit resembles a light green mango in appearance though some fruit bulge at each end looking more like a green Mr. Peanut. The flesh of the fruit it light yellow and has smooth custard like consistency. Each fruit contains 6 to12 black seeds. Pawpaw’s flavor reminds me of banana and mango with hints of vanilla. Some local names given to this native food are Ozark banana, Indiana banana, wild banana, Kentucky banana, banango… Are you noticing a pattern?

pawpaw_comparison
2 varieties of pawpaw

There are multiple varieties of wild growing pawpaw. Their fruits vary in size, color, skin thickness, flavor and number of seeds. Here at the camp we are fortunate enough to have a very juicy and tasty variety of pawpaw. The closest relative of the pawpaw grows in the tropics. Pawpaw is related to soursop, sweetsop cherimoya and other Annonaceae family trees… all of which I love to eat. Unfortunately these guys only grow far, far away.

Soursop in Jamaica
Soursop in Jamaica

Both the pawpaw tree and fruit have complex chemical properties that have both health and agricultural applications. Compounds known as acetogenins in the leaves, twigs and bark of the pawpaws are a natural insecticide and show anti-cancer properties. Pawpaw fruit is higher in protein than most fruits and is also rich in fatty acids. Caprylic acid (octanoic acid) in pawpaw fruits is a compound shown effective against bacteria infection and is also used in supplements taken to suppress candida.

Enjoy this pawpaw hunting video from October of this year and stay tuned for my next post where I’ll show you how to make a pawpaw pie.

blog, How To

Prepare for Spring

raw_gardens_kale_collards_tobacco

Greetings Health Fans,

It’s still a bit chilly around here but I thought I’d share a video from last summer that features one of my raised bed gardens at Camp Rawnora. I used old fence posts and fence boards to create the frame for the garden. The length of the fence boards determined the length of my garden. The only cutting I did was on the fence posts which I cut down to 14 inches. I dug a 6 inch deep hole for each of them and secured them in the ground before attaching the face boards. With recycled wood it is important to pre-drill holes and secure everything with wood screws. This aged wood had a tendency to split at the ends and pre-drilling will prevent that.

Underneath I lined the ground with cardboard and newspaper to kill off the grass and to prevent weeds from growing up into the bed. Eventually all of this material will breakdown and turn into future fertilizer. The beds were filled with composted manure which our horses happily produce. I topped the beds and the walkway around the bed with woodchips. This was useful for retaining moisture in the beds especially during the drought we had last summer.

humming_bird_tobacco_flower

All the plants that went into the raised bed were grown from organic seed started under grow lights and then transplanted. The variety of tobacco used was from heirloom seeds gifted to Camp Rawnora by a Native American. The tobacco leaves and seeds were collected for ceremonial usage. As you can see from the pictures, humming birds enjoy the bountiful yellow blooms of the tobacco plant.

Currently the bed has a thick layer of dead leaves on top of it which is covered in a layer of snow. Eventually the snow will melt and it will be time to replant the bed. This year I plan on using activated EM to prepare the soil and I hope to experiment with compost tea as well. I’ll be sure to post my progress.

Keep it Live!

 

blog, Recipe

Raw Update from Camp Rawnora and Chef Adam

Goshen, IN Meetup

Greetings to all you health crusaders out there.

There’s a lot going on in these parts… workshops, retreats, potlucks… oh my! And don’t forget the Saturday farmer’s market in St. Joe, MI.

The Herald Palladium, a local paper here in Michigan, did a feature this month on raw foods. They interviewed me regarding my experience with raw foods. Here’s the link: http://heraldpalladium.com/articles/2012/06/12/features/10257118.txt They also did a counter point interview with a “dietician/nutritionist” from a local hospital. I have yet to find a medical facility that has a decent grasp on nutrition. Read her interview and decide for yourself. I’m a little at odds with her recommendation of soy and canola oil… my stomach turns just thinking about it. This isn’t surprising considering many medical facilities give products like “Boost” to their patients considering it “healthy”. Here’s a snap shot of this “health” drink’s label… you decide.

Is this nutritious?

Second and third ingredients are sugar plus 5 obvious GMO ingredients and a whole chemical cocktail to follow… health drink? More like sick drink. Moving on…

I’ve been busy planting the gardens at Camp Rawnora and at Ronora Lodge. Half of the large greenhouse is planted with kale and tomatoes. I also constructed a couple of raised beds for tomatoes, kale, collards and tobacco (ceremonial).

The fruit tree crop was devastated here in Southwest Michigan due to warm weather in March which got the fruit trees blooming early only to get nailed by freezing temperatures in April. The berries are still in full effect along with melons that will be ripe in August… just in time for the Abundance Vortex weekend August 3-5. Mark your calendar, buy your ticket and pack your tent. This should be quite an event.

Here’s a tasty recipe and video to hold you over until your visit in August… Tropical chia fruit salad.

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