blog, Raw Food Adventures, Recipe

Keep Warm in Those Cold Months Raw Vegan Style

Greetings Health Fans,winter_shadow

Chef Adam checking during his winter travels. I have escaped to the West Coast for a little sunshine and fun times. Though I’ve been living in Michigan year round for the past 4 years, I still don’t care much for the winter months. Yes, the pristine white snow and the serenity of winter have their charm but I can enjoy these scenes nestled in a hammock or with my toes in the warm sand.

winter_teaStaying raw in the wintertime can be challenging especially if you’re going to be inflexible about things. Flexibility is your key to success. Hot tea and warming foods have been my saviors during the winter. During the cold months I still start my day off with 32 ounces of water with minerals or fresh lemon. The only difference is that I warm the water first. Not in the microwave though, I use an electric kettle. This warmth first thing in the morning makes a world of difference too. Also I make a point to eat fruits at room temperature and allow refrigerated food items to warm to room temperature before consuming them.

Skin brushing first thing in the morning has a warming effect. Rebounding is a year round staple but it’s especially useful in the wintertime to get the circulation going and warm up the body. Hot teas throughout the day are great for maintaining warmth. I make a point to have a variety of loose medicinal teas like reishi, pau d’arco, oat straw, cat’s claw, holy basil, mint and sarsaparilla on hand to drop into my French press and brew a custom tea that will support my immune system.

When all else fails I have something cooked in the crock pot. My favorites are sweet potato or any of the hard winter squashes. I like things simple and so I simply wash whatever I’m crocking, put it into the pot, set it on high and check back in 2 hours. Most folks like to cut their squash in half and scoop out the seeds. That’s easy enough to do but sometimes I throw the whole thing in and deal with the seeds once it’s been cooked.

To top the squash or sweet potato I like to make an enzyme and probiotic rich sauce using miso paste, some warm water, coconut oil and some spices. I hand mix these items in a small bowl and then pour them over what ever I’ve prepared. Here’s a basic recipe:

1 TB organic miso paste

1 TB coconut oil

2 TB hot water

1/4 tsp cinnamon or ginger

Combine ingredients in a bowl and pour over squash or sweet potato.

Where ever you are I hope you’re warm, safe and well nourished.

Keep it Live!

Adam

How To, Recipe

Miso Madness

Miso_reduce_cancer

It’s no secret that I’m a huge miso fan. I use miso in dressings, sauces and on almost daily basis in my almond miso spread. My preferred miso of choice is chickpea miso either from South River Miso or Miso Master. Both brands are organic and GMO-free. When shopping for miso, look for it in the refrigerated foods section of the health food store. Your average grocery store will not have miso unless it’s an Asian market. Miso seems to be a food item only appreciated by those with an Asian upbringing or those aware of the importance of fermented foods.

Chickpea_Miso

Miso is my favorite of all the ferments because of its flavor, functionality and superfood status. Miso is a fermented bean paste that most people are familiar with in the form of miso soup. The soup, being made with boiling water is unfortunately dead. There’s no need to kill your miso in the process of making soup. Especially considering the time invested in making this living food which is anywhere from 3 months to 3 years. Heating water to 150F and allowing it to cool will make soup that is warm and alive. Miso has many endearing qualities. For starters it takes an indigestible protein source – beans, legumes and pulses – and makes them digestible. The bean most commonly used to produce miso is soybean. Because of GMO (genetically modified organisms) concerns, one must be sure to purchase organic miso products to insure that you are not consuming a food containing genetically modified ingredients. I am a fan of chickpea miso, which has no soy in it at all. Miso must be unpasteurized to retain its health benefits. Miso powders are not a substitute to vibrant living unpasteurized miso paste. Miso has a hearty salty flavor with earthy undertones that are dependent on the ingredients used to make it. Dark misos are heartier and make wonderful additions to savory recipes while light misos are salty and slightly sweet allowing them to be used in milder creations.

In Asian countries like China, Korea and Japan; miso and fermented vegetables are a traditional daily staple. In some households they are served with every meal.

South_River_MisoMiso contains Lactobacillus like other friendly ferments. This probitoic has been shown to protect against E. Coli, Salmonella and Shigella. Another beneficial characteristic of unpasteurized miso is its ability to detox heavy metals and radiation from the body. Miso is a enzyme rich, protein dominant food containing all the essential amino acids. Miso contains omega-3 fats as well as lecithin, which is an emulsifier. This combination allows miso to balance cholesterol in the body. Miso is also a great source of calcium and B vitamins. Its salty taste allows you to use it in place of salt in many recipes.

Enjoy this miso marinade recipe and video. I hope you can join me at one of our upcoming retreats and Camp Rawnora in Michigan. The marinated asparagus is sure to be delicious. Keep it Live!

Wild Asparagus
Wild Asparagus

 

 

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blog, How To, Recipe

Rock’n the Kelp Noodles

Still not so sure on how to prepare Kelp Noodles? Well never fear The Live Food Experience is here to guide you through your sea tangle noodle adventure. Kelp noodles are a raw vegan no cook alternative to traditional grain based noodles that require cooking. The magic of kelp noodles is that you just open the bag and they’re ready to go… well not quite. The secret I’m about to share with you will maximize your kelp noodle experience. Follow these simple steps and you will enjoy your noodles, do not follow these steps and… not so good.

  1. Open the bag
  2. Pour out the juice
  3. Squeeze the noodles
  4. Rinse the noodles
  5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 one more time
  6. SQUEEZE NOODLES

The most important thing to remember is that the last thing you should do to the noodles is squeeze them and squeeze them hard. This will allow them to soak up the tasty sauce you have prepared. You may be saying, “I haven’t prepared a tasty sauce.” Well I took that into consideration and thought up one for you to prepare.

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Here’s a video to bring home the message… Squeeze, Rinse, Squeeze, Rinse, SQUEEEEEEEEEEZZZZZEEEE!!!! Enjoy.

blog, Recipe

Best raw stuffing? Best raw gravy? You tell me.

raw pumpkin pie

Hi all,

Here’s a quick post featuring 2 recipes I recently put together for a Raw Vegan Thanksgiving Potluck at Camp Rawnora. We had a wonderful turnout with raw dishes that were delish and beautiful. Some of the simplest dishes are the best like a corn chip and guacamole combo that one guest brought. Being the host I had to step up my game and turn out some dishes that were beyond delicious… I prepared a variation of Cafe Gratitude’s Pumpkin Pie recipe from their amazing recipe book I Am Grateful, also found in their dessert recipe book Sweet Gratitude. These books are the foundation for most of the raw food chef’s that are emerging each day. Master the recipes in these 2 books and you don’t need a chef training course… though it’s nice to get some instruction from a seasoned chef.

raw stuffing

Stuffing (aka: dressing) and Gravy were my 2 other menu items. Both of which I had a vague idea of how I’d reverse engineer them. For the stuffing I was looking for some way to keep it light and avoid making a nut gut bomb. A combo of almonds, walnuts and marinated portabello mushrooms was my solution. The way I did this recipe may be prohibitive for those wanting to do something quick and easy because I had stockpiled dried marinated portabella mushrooms which most people don’t have on hand. Here’s the trick… get dried mushrooms for the recipe and just add the ingredients that are in the marinade to the recipe like so…

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If anyone has taken a class or worked with me in the kitchen you know how I love to “sweat” veggies and use the juice that is removed in other recipes like soups and sauces. With the dressing/stuffing we’re sweating the veggies and using the juice in the gravy recipe. This keeps our stuffing from being soggy and this also adds flavor to our gravy.

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raw_mushroom_gravy
raw gravy on cauliflower parsnip taters

With the recipes out of the way, now it’s time for shameless self-promotion… If you liked these recipes you’re going to love the 13 recipes featured in the Raw 2012 Calendar from Camp Rawnora. Full color pictures and some amazing raw recipes to get you through the year… $10 to start with discounts for multiple orders.

Raw 2012 Calendar

Start off 2012 with a health retreat in Jamaica. Join me (Chef Adam Graham) and Chef John Rasmussen in Jamaica for a 8 day 7 night retreat (January 7-14th).

Jamaica Raw Retreat
Sun and raw food fun!