How To, Recipe

Miso Madness

Miso_reduce_cancer

It’s no secret that I’m a huge miso fan. I use miso in dressings, sauces and on almost daily basis in my almond miso spread. My preferred miso of choice is chickpea miso either from South River Miso or Miso Master. Both brands are organic and GMO-free. When shopping for miso, look for it in the refrigerated foods section of the health food store. Your average grocery store will not have miso unless it’s an Asian market. Miso seems to be a food item only appreciated by those with an Asian upbringing or those aware of the importance of fermented foods.

Chickpea_Miso

Miso is my favorite of all the ferments because of its flavor, functionality and superfood status. Miso is a fermented bean paste that most people are familiar with in the form of miso soup. The soup, being made with boiling water is unfortunately dead. There’s no need to kill your miso in the process of making soup. Especially considering the time invested in making this living food which is anywhere from 3 months to 3 years. Heating water to 150F and allowing it to cool will make soup that is warm and alive. Miso has many endearing qualities. For starters it takes an indigestible protein source – beans, legumes and pulses – and makes them digestible. The bean most commonly used to produce miso is soybean. Because of GMO (genetically modified organisms) concerns, one must be sure to purchase organic miso products to insure that you are not consuming a food containing genetically modified ingredients. I am a fan of chickpea miso, which has no soy in it at all. Miso must be unpasteurized to retain its health benefits. Miso powders are not a substitute to vibrant living unpasteurized miso paste. Miso has a hearty salty flavor with earthy undertones that are dependent on the ingredients used to make it. Dark misos are heartier and make wonderful additions to savory recipes while light misos are salty and slightly sweet allowing them to be used in milder creations.

In Asian countries like China, Korea and Japan; miso and fermented vegetables are a traditional daily staple. In some households they are served with every meal.

South_River_MisoMiso contains Lactobacillus like other friendly ferments. This probitoic has been shown to protect against E. Coli, Salmonella and Shigella. Another beneficial characteristic of unpasteurized miso is its ability to detox heavy metals and radiation from the body. Miso is a enzyme rich, protein dominant food containing all the essential amino acids. Miso contains omega-3 fats as well as lecithin, which is an emulsifier. This combination allows miso to balance cholesterol in the body. Miso is also a great source of calcium and B vitamins. Its salty taste allows you to use it in place of salt in many recipes.

Enjoy this miso marinade recipe and video. I hope you can join me at one of our upcoming retreats and Camp Rawnora in Michigan. The marinated asparagus is sure to be delicious. Keep it Live!

Wild Asparagus
Wild Asparagus

 

 

Simple Miso Marinade

Ingredients

  • 3 T Miso
  • ¼ C lemon juice
  • ¼ C olive oil
  • 2 t palm sugar or agave
  • 1 t tamari
  • 1 clove garlic – pressed

Instructions

  1. Blend all ingredients together.
  2. Use this marinade on mushrooms and veggies.
  3. Place items to be marinated in a sealable container and cover.
  4. Seal container and shake vigorously.
  5. Refrigerate if you plan on marinating for more than 2 hours.
http://www.livefoodexperience.com/2013/04/miso-madness/

blog, Recipe

Best raw stuffing? Best raw gravy? You tell me.

raw pumpkin pie

Hi all,

Here’s a quick post featuring 2 recipes I recently put together for a Raw Vegan Thanksgiving Potluck at Camp Rawnora. We had a wonderful turnout with raw dishes that were delish and beautiful. Some of the simplest dishes are the best like a corn chip and guacamole combo that one guest brought. Being the host I had to step up my game and turn out some dishes that were beyond delicious… I prepared a variation of Cafe Gratitude’s Pumpkin Pie recipe from their amazing recipe book I Am Grateful, also found in their dessert recipe book Sweet Gratitude. These books are the foundation for most of the raw food chef’s that are emerging each day. Master the recipes in these 2 books and you don’t need a chef training course… though it’s nice to get some instruction from a seasoned chef.

raw stuffing

Stuffing (aka: dressing) and Gravy were my 2 other menu items. Both of which I had a vague idea of how I’d reverse engineer them. For the stuffing I was looking for some way to keep it light and avoid making a nut gut bomb. A combo of almonds, walnuts and marinated portabello mushrooms was my solution. The way I did this recipe may be prohibitive for those wanting to do something quick and easy because I had stockpiled dried marinated portabella mushrooms which most people don’t have on hand. Here’s the trick… get dried mushrooms for the recipe and just add the ingredients that are in the marinade to the recipe like so…

Best Raw Stuffing

Best Raw Stuffing

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 C dried mushrooms - shitake, portabello, mitake, oyster...
  • 1/4 C sesame oil
  • 1 T raw apple cider vinegar
  • 2 T miso - chickpea or non-GMO soy miso
  • 1 C butternut squash or zucchini - shredded
  • 1/2 C celery - diced
  • 1 3/4 C onion - diced
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 2 C walnuts
  • 2 C almonds
  • 2 t dry sage - minced
  • 2 t fresh thyme - minced
  • 1 1/2 T fresh rosemary - minced
  • 2 T fresh parsley - minced

Instructions

  1. Whisk together apple cider vinegar, oil and miso.
  2. Add remaining ingredients (except for the nuts and herbs) to bowl and coat evenly.
  3. Allow mixture to sit at least 1 hour, preferably 3 hours or refrigerated overnight.
  4. *Transfer mixture to seed milk bag or sieve and strain off juice most of the juice. DO NOT DISCARD, this will be added to your gravy recipe.
  5. Pulse nuts and herbs in food processor to break into small pieces.
  6. Add marinated veggie mixture to food processor and pulse in.
  7. Best served warmed in the dehydrator for 1-2 hours at 120F.
http://www.livefoodexperience.com/2011/11/best-raw-stuffing-best-raw-gravy-you-tell-me/

If anyone has taken a class or worked with me in the kitchen you know how I love to “sweat” veggies and use the juice that is removed in other recipes like soups and sauces. With the dressing/stuffing we’re sweating the veggies and using the juice in the gravy recipe. This keeps our stuffing from being soggy and this also adds flavor to our gravy.

Best raw gravy?

Ingredients

  • 1 C dried shitake mushrooms - rehydrate with 1/2 C water
  • 1/2 C sun dried tomato - rehydrate with 1/2 C water
  • *1/2 C marinated veggie juice - from stuffing recipe
  • 1 1/2 - 2 C of water
  • 1 - 2 T miso
  • 2 T olive oil
  • 2 t dry sage
  • 1 t paprika
  • 1 t apple cider vinegar
  • 1/2 t salt

Instructions

  1. Fully rehydrate mushrooms and tomatoes to prevent premature blender death.
  2. Add all ingredients to blender and blend smooth.
  3. Add water to blender to get desired gravy consistency.
  4. Check flavor, add more salt, sage and/or miso if necessary.
  5. Best served warmed to 120F.
  6. *Leftover gravy can be turned into soup or used in cracker recipes.
http://www.livefoodexperience.com/2011/11/best-raw-stuffing-best-raw-gravy-you-tell-me/

raw_mushroom_gravy
raw gravy on cauliflower parsnip taters

With the recipes out of the way, now it’s time for shameless self-promotion… If you liked these recipes you’re going to love the 13 recipes featured in the Raw 2012 Calendar from Camp Rawnora. Full color pictures and some amazing raw recipes to get you through the year… $10 to start with discounts for multiple orders.

Raw 2012 Calendar

Start off 2012 with a health retreat in Jamaica. Join me (Chef Adam Graham) and Chef John Rasmussen in Jamaica for a 8 day 7 night retreat (January 7-14th).

Jamaica Raw Retreat
Sun and raw food fun!
Raw Food Adventures, Recipe

Kale Chips, Zucchini and Butterflies

  

Butterflies at Ronora

The gardens are going off here in Michigan, zucchini, kale, chard and tomatoes abound. I had a major kale, zucchini and brocolli harvest last week. I made zucchini crackers, kale chips and pickled brocolli… all by myself. It’s at times like this that I wish I had an intern. I’m sure the universe will deliver one once I’m good and ready. I’ve had a few inquiries but I haven’t been able to follow up on them. All in good time. The non-profit group Camp Butterfly was here at Ronora Lodge this past week. The group  is a nonprofit organization based in Chicago dedicated to the holistic development of girls of African descent. I was given the honor of leading a tour through the garden. I showed the girls all the amazning things we had growing both in the garden and everywhere else. I’m sure they were suprised to see me pulling up what looked like weeds and chomping on them. Some of the girls were brave enough to try wood sorrel and lamb’s quarter. What they really enjoyed was harvesting cucumbers, kale and gigantic zucchini. Many of them took a zuke home with them as a souvenier.   

Pickling Supplies

With all this fresh produce coming in I got to pickling and dehydrating. First I sliced a gigantic zuke long ways on the V-slicer/mandolin. I put these slices in a bowl and covered them in a marinade. (RECIPE BELOW) There was a lot of zuke to marinade so I made an extra big batch.   

Next it was time to pickle, using a mixture of 1 tablespoon of pink salt to 1 cup of water I began pickling brocolli. I cut up the brocolli and stuffed it in a large jar with garlic cloves and flowering dill. After the jar was packed tight I poured the brine over it and put a jar full of water on top of the mixture to weight it down.   

 

  

Then I moved on to the kale… lots of kale. I stemmed half the kale while the zukes were marinading. Once I finished stemming I dusted the kale with salt and massaged it. After a half hour the marinade had drawn the liquid out of the zucchini and made nice soup mixture in the bowl. I scooped out this marinade zuke juice mixture and filled the vitamix. This was the base for my kale chip coating. I added 1 cup of sunflower seeds  and 3 TB of nutritional yeast to 3 cups of the liquid I had in the vitamix. The consistency I was aiming for was a that of a thick paste almost like hummus. Once I achieved the flavor and consistency I was looking for I coated the kale and put it in the dehydrator to dry.   

Once the kale was in the dehydrator I got on finishing up the zukes. I was making mini pizza slices. It turned out I had too many zucchini slices and not enough patience so I put over half of the zucchini in the blender and pureed it, then I added chia, sprouted buckwheat and pixie dust and made crackers… yum.   

It’s dangerous to leave me alone with the kale chips and this was no exception. The next morning I went into the raw kitchen and was greeted by the smell of all of these savory snacks drying. I think between the zuke crackers, the kale chips and the pizza strips my favorite were the crackers. All of the recipes had the same marinade as their base which I then tweaked to get the flavor and consistency I was looking for… gadgeting at its finest. Come and visit me… I might have some kale chips left. Keep it Live!   

    

 Magik Marinade Recipe 
  • 2 whole tomatoes
  • 1/2 yellow onion
  • 1/2 C pumpkin seeds
  • 3 T palm sugar
  • 1/4 C tamari (Miso Master)
  • 1 lime – juiced
  • 2 T apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 C nutritional yeast
  • 1 t paprika
  • 1 T pink salt
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 1 hot pepper
  • 1/2 C olive oil

Blend smooth, pour over vegetables to be marinaded and coat evenly.

blog, How To, Recipe

Rosemary Corn Shroom

Rosemary Corn Shroom

Hi all,

Recently I was asked, thanks to Heathy, to be a featured chef on the new website and online community Eighty Percent Raw. This site was started to provide support for individuals interested in refining their diet and moving towards a healthy more sustainable way of eating and living. March 1st was the launch of 80% Raw. As a contributing chef I put together a simple side dish recipe that requires no special training, gadgets or tools. Visit Eighty Percent Raw the innargarul March edition. In the meantime check out this video featuring Rosemary Corn Shroom.