blog, How To, Recipe

Kelp Noodle Fun

Oodles of Noodles $4 a bag

I’ve got a ton of kelp noodles and I’d love to share them with you! For those of you that aren’t familiar with kelp noodles don’t worry, they aren’t green or slimy and they don’t smell like low tide. They are actually clear and crunchy and when properly rinsed and squeezed out they have very little taste at all… like a good noodle should. So what does one do with these crispy noodles? Anything you want. I like to combine my kelp noodles with other veggies like carrots, onions, zucchini and tomato and then smoother them in a tasty sauce. They are also great in soups and wraps.

First the basics on how to prepare the noodles:

  1. Cut open the top of the bag and drain the liquid out of the bag while holding onto the noodles through the bag.
  2. Once the liquid has drained then squeeze the bag and the noodles inside the bag with all of your might. You want to get as much of the water out of the noodles as possible.
  3. Once the noodles have been squeezed, fill the bag with filtered water and repeat step 2. Do this at least 2 times, soaking, dumping and squeezing the water out.
  4. Transfer the squeezed noodles to a bowl and use scissors or a knife to cut them into smaller pieces. You can also break them up with your hands.
  5. Now your noodles are ready for other veggies and a sauce.

Here are 2 of my favorite sauce recipes:

Hemp Miso Sauce

  • ¾ C hemp seed or 1/2 C almond butter
  • 1 orange – juiced
  • 2 T apple cider vinegar
  • 3 T miso
  • 1/3 C olive oil
  • salt to taste

Place ingredients in the blender and blend smooth.

Sundried Tomato Marinara

  • 1 C sundried tomatoes* – soaked for at least 3 hours
  • 1 C fresh tomatoes – diced
  • 1/4 C onion – diced
  • 2 T olive oil
  • 1 – 2 T hemp seeds – optional
  • 1 T Italian herbs – basil, oregano, rosemary, thyme
  • 2 t apple cider vinegar
  • 1-2 t agave
  • sea salt to taste
  • 1 clove garlic, pressed – optional
  1. Pour the sundried tomatoes and the soak water into the blender and blend smooth.
  2. Add the remaining ingredients and blend.
  3. Adjust salt to taste.

*Some sundried tomatoes are salt cured. This will effect the saltiness of the sauce. Adjust the salt in the recipe accordingly.

4 great things about kelp noodles:

  1. They don’t need to be refrigerated until after you open them.
  2. You don’t need to boil water to prepare them.
  3. They have next to no calories and are a good source of fiber and trace minerals.
  4. When marinaded or warmed slightly the noodles become soft.

If you want some noodles I’ve got a deal for you.  $4.00 a bag or 8 bags for $3.50 each ($28). These are 1 pound (16 oz) bags. Most bags in the store are the smaller 10 oz. bags and they sell for more than this.

Contact if you’re interested in this kelp noodle deal – livefoodexperience (at) live (dot) com

Keep It Live! – Adam

blog, Raw Food Adventures

San Diego Wrap Up…

Noodles and Hemp Miso Sauce

Things are winding down in San Diego after an amazing raw food demo organized by the San Diego County Raw Vegan Meetup group. 20 healthy and happy folks were in attendance at a lovely location in Rancho Sante Fe. I’m not kidding when I say “lovely”… beautiful, exquisite and luxurious are also words that come to mind when I think of the amazing kitchen I had the opportunity to demo in. The home owner who hosted the event, Julie, has her own business selling eco-friendly personal utensil kits called “MyTensils”. Take a look at the varieties of travel sets that she has on her site. The utensils are made of light weight super strong titanium and a variety of stylish hemp fabric holsters. I have to extend thanks to Erika as well who is the meetup group organizer. She works with chef Perkunas at VeggieVibes.net. They offer a weekly menu of raw and vegan cooked food delivered to your door… in San Diego. And my last shout out goes my dear friend Robyn who put me in touch with Erika and got things rolling for this demo to manifest. Robyn hooked me up with this demo, a place to stay and even a surfboard so I could get water time while in San Diego. Much love to this West Coast Crew that made this demo happen.

Robyn, Adam, Erika and Julie

Featured recipes were the Apple-Avo Gadget and Coco-Banana Gadget, both recipes are in my book Zen and the Art of Gadgeting. I also demoed an almond miso spread which I turned into a soup along with a hemp miso sauce which we poured on top of kelp and zucchini noodles. There was enough yummy raw food goodness to go round and round and round.

Fun, food and information were at the heart of the demo and while me and the kitchen crew put together noodle bowls, the guests watched a DVD featuring Viktoras Kulvinskas. For those of you not familiar with Viktoras he’s one of the pillars of the raw food community. He founded Hippocrate’s Health Institute with Ann Wigmore back in the day and published a “must read” book, Survival in the 21st Century. The DVD was recorded at a lecture he gave in Palm Coast, Florida in October of 2009. It’s packed with useful information about health and longevity and is available for purchase online.

Stayed tuned for my next post which will feature raw pizza and Egyptian pie that Robyn and I made on my last day in San Diego… Keep it Live!

blog, How To, Raw Food Adventures, Recipe

Raw Spirit and San Diego Fun

We got noodles and kraut

The Live Food Experience is on the road again. This time I went to Raw Spirit Festival in Prescott, AZ and now I’m in San Diego to see family, friends, surf and teach a class. At Raw Spirit Fest I teamed up with my friend Savrah of “Savrakraut” and we were vendors. Our booth featured kelp noodles with a hemp miso sauce and 6 different kinds of sauerkraut. Savrah is a good friend from back in Tree of Life days. Currently she lives in LA where she makes her hand-crafted fermented veggies. The flavors we featured at the fest were classic, kimchi, lemon garlic dill, fennel, garlic pickled veggies and goji Chinese 5 spice. During the festival I also taught a food prep demo. The fest was a good time but unfortunately attendance was pretty low. It almost seemed like staff, vendors and volunteers out numbered guests. In the end I was able to make my money back from the fest but it is unlikely that I’ll be a vendor in the future.

Friday Night Demo

Why the low attendance? For one thing Raw Spirit Fest is a niche event so many mainstream people just can’t bring themselves to attend. Another reason may be that this years line up of speakers and presenters was pretty bland. On top of all that the biggest name at the event Viktoras Kulvinskas canceled due to a “family emergency”. Oh yeah, and the Longevity Conference with David Wolfe was the exact same weekend. You add all of these factors together and you have quite a challenge on your hands. No regrets though. I really enjoyed myself and made some new friends, like Bud from the Arizona health department who resembled a cross between Matt Damon and Ron Howard. He paid us quite a compliment in trying our food… which he enjoyed. Most everyone enjoyed Savrah’s kraut and the kelp noodles. We actually sold out of noodles on the last day.

After the fest I headed to San Diego where we arrived at 2am. A slight hiccup in plans had me back in LA the next day and evening. While there I was able to catch up with an old friend (Hara) who I had met in Chicago years ago. She’s an actor, writer and director who has been slugging it out in the LA trenches for the past 10 years. We spent the evening catching up and the next morning I caught a ride back to San Diego with a rideshare that was listed on Craigslist.

Bud from AZ Health Dept.

Once back in San Diego at my friend Robyn’s place I was able to relax. I threw together a kale spinach salad dinner with Robyn and her roomie and that evening I dreamed of West Coast surf… The next morning after an early morning green juice, my dreams came true. I headed down to Swami’s in Encinitas and surfed Robyn’s 10 foot long board. I’ve never paddled a board this big but it treated me just fine. Next up, more surf and a raw food demo on Saturday for the San Diego County Raw Foods Meetup group.

Here’s the recipe for the delicious hemp miso sauce that was on the kelp noodles we served:

  • 1/2 C hemp seeds
  • 2 T miso – unpasteurized
  • 1 orange, peeled
  • 1/4 C olive oil
  • 1 T apple cider vinegar
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 2 t fresh ginger
  • salt to taste

Blend all the ingredients smooth. Add water if too thick.

More to come… Keep it Live!

blog, How To, Recipe

Apple Buckwheat Breakfast

unsprouted buckwheat

Sprouted buckwheat is a really magical food. Most people know buckwheat in terms of buckwheat pancakes but sprouted buckwheat ain’t the same thing. Buckwheat isn’t even a grain like the name “wheat” might imply. It’s a “achene” which is a technical term you can investigate. For simplicity sake let’s just call it a seed that is unrelated to wheat therefore having no gluten. Buckwheat flour used for baking and raw buckwheat groats are unsprouted and contain enzyme inhibitors which need to cooked or sprouted to deactivate. Newbie rawfooders may initially have a bad experience working with buckwheat if they don’t sprout it. Buckwheat needs to be thoroughly rinsed, soaked and sprouted. Check out this post regarding sprouting buckwheat.

Once you have sprouted the buckwheat you have a very versatile ingredient for food prep. Don’t be shy when sprouting buckwheat. The sprouted groats can be dehydrated and stored for later use in recipes.

sprouted buckwheat

Buckwheat can have a dominant flavor and texture if not used in the right proportions. When I use it in granola  I typically add 3 times the amount of nuts or seeds to buckwheat in the recipe. You’ll know if you have too much buckwheat in a recipe because it will taste bland and have a chalky feel in the mouth.

Buckwheat is a warming food which makes it a great breakfast option during cold months. It is high in calcium and also a great source of rutin which helps to strengthen capillaries. If you bruise easily or are wanting to rid yourself of varicose veins, add buckwheat to your diet.

Here’s a quick and easy buckwheat recipe. I used apple for this version but banana or pear can easily be substituted. I added hemp oil to give the porridge the satisfying effect when fats are added to a recipe. You can add a thick nut or seed mylk instead or a nut butter. Have fun with the recipe and adapt it to your liking.

Sprouted Buckwheat Apple Porridge

¼ C sprouted buckwheat

3 T shredded coconut

1 apple – cut up

2 T gojis or raisins – mix in at end

1 T maple syrup, honey or agave

1 T sweet cinnamon or 1 t cinnamon

1 T mesquite

1 T hemp oil

1 t maca

pinch of Himalayan salt

Combine in all ingredients except for raisins/gojis in food processor.