blog, Raw Food Adventures

Mango Impossible…

mango

The tan from my Jamaica trip is quickly fading but the memories and videos are still there to remind me of the fun in the sun that I will be having again next year at January in Jamaica 2013. Will you be joining me? Details to come. Speaking of details, we’re putting together the schedule of events for Camp Rawnora for 2012. Be sure to visit the Camp Rawnora site to find out what’s uncooking. We’ve got a Spring Detox Weekend and Forage scheduled for April and 5 Day Cleanse/Detox on the calendar for May… Weight Loss Camp in June… just check the calendar, more details to come.

Enjoy these mango factoids and the video from Jamaica below…

  • Mangoes originated in India and eventually spread from there throughout the globe.
  • They contain high amounts of vitamin C, A, B6, other B vitamins, prebiotic fiber, potassium, copper, amino acids, beta carotene and a variety of antioxidants.
  • 2 chemicals in mangoes (triterpene and lupeol) have been shown effective against prostate and skin cancer.
  • Mango skin and leaves contain the chemical urushiol  which is also present in poison ivy and poison oak. This accounts for many people having an allergic skin reaction to mango.

mango cut

 

 

blog, Raw Food Adventures, Recipe

Raw Food Adventures in Jamaica

jamaica_rainbow
Rainbow at Natania's

Greetings from Jamaica… I wish you all could be here. As mentioned in earlier posts I am involved with a health and wellness retreat in Jamaica for most of January. So far the visit has proven to be quite an adventure. I’ve been staying at Natania’s Guest House in Westmoreland parish in the small town of Culloden. The place is right on the ocean front with a small sandy beach and Sandals Resort – Whitehouse as our neighbor across the water. I find it to be a bit ironic that we’d be teaching people how to eat for health and longevity across the water from a high end resort with little regard for any of these things.

ackeeAckee has been the big surprise of my visit. I was familiar with this food from a visit to Jamaica when I was 10 years old. What little I remember is that it looked like scrambled eggs when prepared and that it was poisonous if consumed unripe. “Can you eat it raw?” was the first question that came to mind and it turns out the answer is “yes” though most people don’t. Ackee is one of the few fruits with a high fat content (between 51-58%), 55% of the fat being linoleic acid (short chain omega-6 fats). Ackee has a neutral to savory taste and a firm, brittle texture when fresh that surrenders to mush over time. One of the yoga instructors at the retreat(Yoshi) had quite an affinity for raw ackee which he enjoyed eating with onion and Scotch bonnet peppers. His passion for ackee inspired me to create an ackee omelet with a Scotch bonnet pepper salsa. Enjoy the video and recipes… and Keep it Live!

[amd-zlrecipe-recipe:11]

ackee omelet
Breakfast of Champs

[amd-zlrecipe-recipe:12]

blog, How To, Recipe

Kelp Noodle Fun

Oodles of Noodles $4 a bag

I’ve got a ton of kelp noodles and I’d love to share them with you! For those of you that aren’t familiar with kelp noodles don’t worry, they aren’t green or slimy and they don’t smell like low tide. They are actually clear and crunchy and when properly rinsed and squeezed out they have very little taste at all… like a good noodle should. So what does one do with these crispy noodles? Anything you want. I like to combine my kelp noodles with other veggies like carrots, onions, zucchini and tomato and then smoother them in a tasty sauce. They are also great in soups and wraps.

First the basics on how to prepare the noodles:

  1. Cut open the top of the bag and drain the liquid out of the bag while holding onto the noodles through the bag.
  2. Once the liquid has drained then squeeze the bag and the noodles inside the bag with all of your might. You want to get as much of the water out of the noodles as possible.
  3. Once the noodles have been squeezed, fill the bag with filtered water and repeat step 2. Do this at least 2 times, soaking, dumping and squeezing the water out.
  4. Transfer the squeezed noodles to a bowl and use scissors or a knife to cut them into smaller pieces. You can also break them up with your hands.
  5. Now your noodles are ready for other veggies and a sauce.

Here are 2 of my favorite sauce recipes:

Hemp Miso Sauce

  • ¾ C hemp seed or 1/2 C almond butter
  • 1 orange – juiced
  • 2 T apple cider vinegar
  • 3 T miso
  • 1/3 C olive oil
  • salt to taste

Place ingredients in the blender and blend smooth.

Sundried Tomato Marinara

  • 1 C sundried tomatoes* – soaked for at least 3 hours
  • 1 C fresh tomatoes – diced
  • 1/4 C onion – diced
  • 2 T olive oil
  • 1 – 2 T hemp seeds – optional
  • 1 T Italian herbs – basil, oregano, rosemary, thyme
  • 2 t apple cider vinegar
  • 1-2 t agave
  • sea salt to taste
  • 1 clove garlic, pressed – optional
  1. Pour the sundried tomatoes and the soak water into the blender and blend smooth.
  2. Add the remaining ingredients and blend.
  3. Adjust salt to taste.

*Some sundried tomatoes are salt cured. This will effect the saltiness of the sauce. Adjust the salt in the recipe accordingly.

4 great things about kelp noodles:

  1. They don’t need to be refrigerated until after you open them.
  2. You don’t need to boil water to prepare them.
  3. They have next to no calories and are a good source of fiber and trace minerals.
  4. When marinaded or warmed slightly the noodles become soft.

If you want some noodles I’ve got a deal for you.  $4.00 a bag or 8 bags for $3.50 each ($28). These are 1 pound (16 oz) bags. Most bags in the store are the smaller 10 oz. bags and they sell for more than this.

Contact if you’re interested in this kelp noodle deal – livefoodexperience (at) live (dot) com

Keep It Live! – Adam