Raw Food Adventures, Recipe

Kale Chips, Zucchini and Butterflies

  

Butterflies at Ronora

The gardens are going off here in Michigan, zucchini, kale, chard and tomatoes abound. I had a major kale, zucchini and brocolli harvest last week. I made zucchini crackers, kale chips and pickled brocolli… all by myself. It’s at times like this that I wish I had an intern. I’m sure the universe will deliver one once I’m good and ready. I’ve had a few inquiries but I haven’t been able to follow up on them. All in good time. The non-profit group Camp Butterfly was here at Ronora Lodge this past week. The group  is a nonprofit organization based in Chicago dedicated to the holistic development of girls of African descent. I was given the honor of leading a tour through the garden. I showed the girls all the amazning things we had growing both in the garden and everywhere else. I’m sure they were suprised to see me pulling up what looked like weeds and chomping on them. Some of the girls were brave enough to try wood sorrel and lamb’s quarter. What they really enjoyed was harvesting cucumbers, kale and gigantic zucchini. Many of them took a zuke home with them as a souvenier.   

Pickling Supplies

With all this fresh produce coming in I got to pickling and dehydrating. First I sliced a gigantic zuke long ways on the V-slicer/mandolin. I put these slices in a bowl and covered them in a marinade. (RECIPE BELOW) There was a lot of zuke to marinade so I made an extra big batch.   

Next it was time to pickle, using a mixture of 1 tablespoon of pink salt to 1 cup of water I began pickling brocolli. I cut up the brocolli and stuffed it in a large jar with garlic cloves and flowering dill. After the jar was packed tight I poured the brine over it and put a jar full of water on top of the mixture to weight it down.   

 

  

Then I moved on to the kale… lots of kale. I stemmed half the kale while the zukes were marinading. Once I finished stemming I dusted the kale with salt and massaged it. After a half hour the marinade had drawn the liquid out of the zucchini and made nice soup mixture in the bowl. I scooped out this marinade zuke juice mixture and filled the vitamix. This was the base for my kale chip coating. I added 1 cup of sunflower seeds  and 3 TB of nutritional yeast to 3 cups of the liquid I had in the vitamix. The consistency I was aiming for was a that of a thick paste almost like hummus. Once I achieved the flavor and consistency I was looking for I coated the kale and put it in the dehydrator to dry.   

Once the kale was in the dehydrator I got on finishing up the zukes. I was making mini pizza slices. It turned out I had too many zucchini slices and not enough patience so I put over half of the zucchini in the blender and pureed it, then I added chia, sprouted buckwheat and pixie dust and made crackers… yum.   

It’s dangerous to leave me alone with the kale chips and this was no exception. The next morning I went into the raw kitchen and was greeted by the smell of all of these savory snacks drying. I think between the zuke crackers, the kale chips and the pizza strips my favorite were the crackers. All of the recipes had the same marinade as their base which I then tweaked to get the flavor and consistency I was looking for… gadgeting at its finest. Come and visit me… I might have some kale chips left. Keep it Live!   

    

 Magik Marinade Recipe 
  • 2 whole tomatoes
  • 1/2 yellow onion
  • 1/2 C pumpkin seeds
  • 3 T palm sugar
  • 1/4 C tamari (Miso Master)
  • 1 lime – juiced
  • 2 T apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 C nutritional yeast
  • 1 t paprika
  • 1 T pink salt
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 1 hot pepper
  • 1/2 C olive oil

Blend smooth, pour over vegetables to be marinaded and coat evenly.

blog, How To, Recipe

Marinade My Mushroom

BBQ Eggplant and Shrooms

They say the secrets in the sauce, which is true. But the magic is in the marinade. The trick to making raw foods that really knock the socks off of skeptics and lovers alike is dialing in a boot shootin marinade. Good news kids, most marinades are raw and vegan already. The basic ingredients are an acid, an oil, a sweetener, salt and spices. Unpasteurized apple cider vinegar or citrus juice is your acid. You can choose from any number of organic cold pressed oils. Use agave, palm sugar or yacon syrup if your hardcore raw vegan. And if you’re not so strict use raw honey or maple syrup for sweeteners. Use a healthy sun dried sea salt or Himalayan salt.  Spices… take your pick of chemical free options.

The recipe below is a BBQ style sauce/marinade which I used to marinade eggplant and crimini mushrooms. I marinaded these guys over night and then warmed up the mixture in the dehydrator for a couple hours. The results were delicious fabulous goodness.

This recipe is featured in my soon to be released recipe book entitled “The Live Food Experience”. Subscribe to my blog and be the first kid on your block to have your very own “Live Food Experience”.

BBQ Marinade

Amount Measure Ingredient Preparation / Option
3/4 C sundried tomatoes soaked 2 hours
1 C water use STS water
1/4 C palm sugar
3 T ACV
2 T tamari
1 T miso
2 cloves garlic
2 t ginger minced
1 t chili powder
1 t paprika
1 pinch salt
  1. Blend all the ingredients.
  2. Pour marinade over chopped mushrooms or veggies.
  3. Marinade overnight.
  4. Add marinade veggies to salads, soups and wraps.
blog, How To, Recipe

Apple Buckwheat Breakfast

unsprouted buckwheat

Sprouted buckwheat is a really magical food. Most people know buckwheat in terms of buckwheat pancakes but sprouted buckwheat ain’t the same thing. Buckwheat isn’t even a grain like the name “wheat” might imply. It’s a “achene” which is a technical term you can investigate. For simplicity sake let’s just call it a seed that is unrelated to wheat therefore having no gluten. Buckwheat flour used for baking and raw buckwheat groats are unsprouted and contain enzyme inhibitors which need to cooked or sprouted to deactivate. Newbie rawfooders may initially have a bad experience working with buckwheat if they don’t sprout it. Buckwheat needs to be thoroughly rinsed, soaked and sprouted. Check out this post regarding sprouting buckwheat.

Once you have sprouted the buckwheat you have a very versatile ingredient for food prep. Don’t be shy when sprouting buckwheat. The sprouted groats can be dehydrated and stored for later use in recipes.

sprouted buckwheat

Buckwheat can have a dominant flavor and texture if not used in the right proportions. When I use it in granola  I typically add 3 times the amount of nuts or seeds to buckwheat in the recipe. You’ll know if you have too much buckwheat in a recipe because it will taste bland and have a chalky feel in the mouth.

Buckwheat is a warming food which makes it a great breakfast option during cold months. It is high in calcium and also a great source of rutin which helps to strengthen capillaries. If you bruise easily or are wanting to rid yourself of varicose veins, add buckwheat to your diet.

Here’s a quick and easy buckwheat recipe. I used apple for this version but banana or pear can easily be substituted. I added hemp oil to give the porridge the satisfying effect when fats are added to a recipe. You can add a thick nut or seed mylk instead or a nut butter. Have fun with the recipe and adapt it to your liking.

Sprouted Buckwheat Apple Porridge

¼ C sprouted buckwheat

3 T shredded coconut

1 apple – cut up

2 T gojis or raisins – mix in at end

1 T maple syrup, honey or agave

1 T sweet cinnamon or 1 t cinnamon

1 T mesquite

1 T hemp oil

1 t maca

pinch of Himalayan salt

Combine in all ingredients except for raisins/gojis in food processor.

Uncategorized

Rolling With the Nori Part 2

That's a tight roll
That's a tight roll

Sequels are rarely better than the original but this may be an exception to the rule… well at least this video is shorter. I actually get my roll on. I ended up making a ridiculous amount of filling for these nori sticks. I rolled for about an hour and had only gone through a third of the mix. I recorded this towards the end once I had figured out this advanced rolling technique. If you’re going to roll nori sticks, invite some friends over and make a party of it. No sense in rolling alone. I’ll post my recipe for goji beer and then you got no excuses not to Rawk and Roll.

Love, Adam