blog, Raw Food Adventures, Recipe

Keep Warm in Those Cold Months Raw Vegan Style

Greetings Health Fans,winter_shadow

Chef Adam checking during his winter travels. I have escaped to the West Coast for a little sunshine and fun times. Though I’ve been living in Michigan year round for the past 4 years, I still don’t care much for the winter months. Yes, the pristine white snow and the serenity of winter have their charm but I can enjoy these scenes nestled in a hammock or with my toes in the warm sand.

winter_teaStaying raw in the wintertime can be challenging especially if you’re going to be inflexible about things. Flexibility is your key to success. Hot tea and warming foods have been my saviors during the winter. During the cold months I still start my day off with 32 ounces of water with minerals or fresh lemon. The only difference is that I warm the water first. Not in the microwave though, I use an electric kettle. This warmth first thing in the morning makes a world of difference too. Also I make a point to eat fruits at room temperature and allow refrigerated food items to warm to room temperature before consuming them.

Skin brushing first thing in the morning has a warming effect. Rebounding is a year round staple but it’s especially useful in the wintertime to get the circulation going and warm up the body. Hot teas throughout the day are great for maintaining warmth. I make a point to have a variety of loose medicinal teas like reishi, pau d’arco, oat straw, cat’s claw, holy basil, mint and sarsaparilla on hand to drop into my French press and brew a custom tea that will support my immune system.

When all else fails I have something cooked in the crock pot. My favorites are sweet potato or any of the hard winter squashes. I like things simple and so I simply wash whatever I’m crocking, put it into the pot, set it on high and check back in 2 hours. Most folks like to cut their squash in half and scoop out the seeds. That’s easy enough to do but sometimes I throw the whole thing in and deal with the seeds once it’s been cooked.

To top the squash or sweet potato I like to make an enzyme and probiotic rich sauce using miso paste, some warm water, coconut oil and some spices. I hand mix these items in a small bowl and then pour them over what ever I’ve prepared. Here’s a basic recipe:

1 TB organic miso paste

1 TB coconut oil

2 TB hot water

1/4 tsp cinnamon or ginger

Combine ingredients in a bowl and pour over squash or sweet potato.

Where ever you are I hope you’re warm, safe and well nourished.

Keep it Live!

Adam

blog, Recipe

Chef Adam’s Creations – Years in the Making

CAC site banner2Greetings Health Fans,

You may have noticed the new banner across the top of my website. It features the new logo for my food production business: Chef Adam’s Creations. This has been an on going process that has spanned a couple of years now. It’s a slow process, made even slower because I’ve been working on most of it on my own. Little by little things get done and now I’m finally unveiling the first snack items: Being Bites. This is a line of raw, vegan and gluten-free granola. Featured flavors are Pumpkin Seed Brittle, Cashew Curry Crunch and Almond Ginger Snap. All 3 have a unique flavor, are made with high quality ingredients and are super satisfying… some might say addictive.

3 Bags Being Bites

A friend once referred to my granola as “snack crack”. I take that as a compliment though I won’t be using it in my promotional materials.

3 Unique Flavors

Pumpkin_Seed_BrittlePumpkin Seed Brittle – *sprouted pumpkin seeds, coconut, *sprouted buckwheat, *cacao nibs, *coconut palm sugar, *ground chia seeds, *maca powder, *agave powder, Himalayan salt, *crushed vanilla bean.

*Organic Ingredients

 

Cashew Curry Crunch – *cashews, coconut, *sprouted buckwheat, *coconut palm sugar, *raisins, *ground chia seeds, *lucuma powder, *curry powder, *maca powder, *agave powder, Himalayan salt.

*Organic Ingredients

 

Almond Ginger Snap – *sprouted almonds, *dried apple, *sprouted buckwheat, *mesquite powder, *coconut palm sugar, *raisins, *ground chia seeds, *maca powder, *cinnamon, *agave powder, *ginger, Himalayan salt.

*Organic Ingredients

 

Give Them A Try!

Here’s a quick recipe for a tasty Berry Whipped Pudding using fresh or frozen berries and avocado… it’s tasty and easy!

1 C fresh/frozen blueberries
1 to 2 peeled oranges or pitted peaches
1/2 to 1 avocado – depends on how creamy you want your pudding
1 TB spirulina or blue green algae
1 tsp maca powder
1/4 tsp cinnamon
pinch of salt

Sweeten to taste with coconut palm sugar, maple syrup or stevia
Blend smooth – add water if too thick
1/2 frozen banana – optional

How To, Recipe

Collard Wraps with Sunflower Seed Tu-No salad

spring crocusGreetings Health Fans,

Happy spring to everyone. The gardens and greenhouses are coming alive here at Camp Rawnora. I’m really enjoying the wild foraging, looking forward to finding some morel mushrooms. The retreat season is underway here at the camp. Here are a few of our upcoming events:

Here’s a timeless classic the Tu-No salad collard wrap.

The recipe is pretty simple. Dulse, which is a sea vegetable, gives it the “tuna” taste. Other sea vegetables can be substituted. Sea veggies are a great source of trace minerals including iodine which is important for thyroid function.

Tu-No Salad

2 C sunflower seeds – soaked

1 – 2 T miso (organic, unpasteurized)

2 T apple cider vinegartu-no salad

2 T lemon juice

1/4 – 1/2 C olive oil

1/2 C onion – diced

1/4 C dulse flakes

1 C celery – diced

2 T capers – add at end

1 – 2 t paprika

1/2 t salt or to taste

Place all ingredients except the capers, onions and celery into the food processor and process smooth.

Transfer the mixture to a bowl and fold in the onions, celery and capers.

Serve in romaine lettuce or collard leaves with other fresh fixings.

 

blog, Raw Food Adventures

Pawpaw, paw paw, papaw… have you heard of it?

Coconut yoghurt and persimmon breakfast
Coconut yoghurt and persimmon breakfast

Winter has well established itself here in Michigan with snow on the ground and temperatures below freezing. It seems that only a week ago I was trekking through the Rawnora landscape in search of pawpaws. What’s a pawpaw you say? That’s a fair question to ask considering this native fruit is relatively new to me as well.

pawpaw_on_treePawpaw, Latin name asimina triloba, is the largest indigenous fruit in North America. The pear-sized fruit resembles a light green mango in appearance though some fruit bulge at each end looking more like a green Mr. Peanut. The flesh of the fruit it light yellow and has smooth custard like consistency. Each fruit contains 6 to12 black seeds. Pawpaw’s flavor reminds me of banana and mango with hints of vanilla. Some local names given to this native food are Ozark banana, Indiana banana, wild banana, Kentucky banana, banango… Are you noticing a pattern?

pawpaw_comparison
2 varieties of pawpaw

There are multiple varieties of wild growing pawpaw. Their fruits vary in size, color, skin thickness, flavor and number of seeds. Here at the camp we are fortunate enough to have a very juicy and tasty variety of pawpaw. The closest relative of the pawpaw grows in the tropics. Pawpaw is related to soursop, sweetsop cherimoya and other Annonaceae family trees… all of which I love to eat. Unfortunately these guys only grow far, far away.

Soursop in Jamaica
Soursop in Jamaica

Both the pawpaw tree and fruit have complex chemical properties that have both health and agricultural applications. Compounds known as acetogenins in the leaves, twigs and bark of the pawpaws are a natural insecticide and show anti-cancer properties. Pawpaw fruit is higher in protein than most fruits and is also rich in fatty acids. Caprylic acid (octanoic acid) in pawpaw fruits is a compound shown effective against bacteria infection and is also used in supplements taken to suppress candida.

Enjoy this pawpaw hunting video from October of this year and stay tuned for my next post where I’ll show you how to make a pawpaw pie.