How To, Recipe

Raw Vegan Onion Bread with Easy Chip Products Form

Driving from MI to AZ
Driving from MI to AZ

Greetings boys and girls. It’s been a long time since my last post and I’ve traveled many miles and had lots of experiences since my last days at Camp Rawnora in Michigan.Sunset_rainbow_TreeOfLife

I was in Patagonia, AZ managing the cafe at The Tree of Life for several months. I enjoyed my brief time in the cafe and living in raw vegan community. Patagonia is a special place and I was fortunate to be there for monsoon season. The desert comes alive when the rains arrive.

MeAndDatPMC

I lost my dad to cancer in September of 2015 and returned to Florida to be closer to my remaining family. I’m still grieving and processing his passing. I miss my dad, Mr. Phil. He was my biggest supporter and my raw food buddy. I love you “D”.raisedbed_LFE

Now I’m living in Orlando, consulting full time at a juice bar called Juice’d. I’ve got a garden, fruit trees and even a worm farm. I plan on returning to more frequent posts, videos, recipes and more.

cuke_macroblueberries

Here’s some onion bread goodness made with a great dehydrator form from my friends who created Easy Chip Products. Check out the video and if you want a form of your own: Tell them “Chef Adam sent me.”

Raw Vegan Onion Bread with Easy Chip Products Form

Raw Vegan Onion Bread with Easy Chip Products Form

Ingredients

  • 3 C almond flour - ground fine
  • 3 sweet onions - 4 1/2 C pureed
  • 3 zucchini @ 2 1/2 C pureed
  • 2 apples @ 2 1/2 C pureed
  • 3 C sunflower seeds
  • 2 C sprouted buckwheat
  • 1 C cashews
  • 1/4 C psyllium or ground flax seeds
  • 1/4 C tamari or coconut aminos
  • 1 TB Himalayan salt

Instructions

  1. Place dry ingredients in blender or food processor and grind into flour. Transfer to a bowl.
  2. Cut up and blend remaining wet ingredients into a puree.
  3. Add puree to dry mixture and combine.
  4. Salt to taste.
  5. Mixture should be spreadable. If too runny add more ground flax or psyllium.
  6. Spread mixture onto drying sheets and score or use Easy Chip Products form.
  7. Dry in dehydrator at 115F for at least 10 hours. Flip off of drying sheets after 4 hours.
http://www.livefoodexperience.com/2016/05/raw-vegan-onion-bread-with-easy-chip-products-form/

How To, Recipe

Collard Wraps with Sunflower Seed Tu-No salad

spring crocusGreetings Health Fans,

Happy spring to everyone. The gardens and greenhouses are coming alive here at Camp Rawnora. I’m really enjoying the wild foraging, looking forward to finding some morel mushrooms. The retreat season is underway here at the camp. Here are a few of our upcoming events:

Here’s a timeless classic the Tu-No salad collard wrap.

The recipe is pretty simple. Dulse, which is a sea vegetable, gives it the “tuna” taste. Other sea vegetables can be substituted. Sea veggies are a great source of trace minerals including iodine which is important for thyroid function.

Tu-No Salad

2 C sunflower seeds – soaked

1 – 2 T miso (organic, unpasteurized)

2 T apple cider vinegartu-no salad

2 T lemon juice

1/4 – 1/2 C olive oil

1/2 C onion – diced

1/4 C dulse flakes

1 C celery – diced

2 T capers – add at end

1 – 2 t paprika

1/2 t salt or to taste

Place all ingredients except the capers, onions and celery into the food processor and process smooth.

Transfer the mixture to a bowl and fold in the onions, celery and capers.

Serve in romaine lettuce or collard leaves with other fresh fixings.

 

blog, How To

Kale Does the Body Good… pass it on

kale bunch

Chef Adam here to share some green love. Kale is one of our favorite things to grow here at Camp Rawnora. We’ve got plants growing in 4 different gardens and we even have a wild patch growing next to the compost pile. Kale is a hearty leafy green that is related to cabbage, collards, broccoli and cauliflower. It’s so hardy that plants grown in the spring will typically survive through winter even when covered in snow. When spring comes around these plants will continue growing, eventually putting out flowers and then going to seed. Kale flowers are a tasty spring treat that are great in salads. Just be sure to leave some for the bees.kale_flower_chomp

I use it salads, smoothies and of course to make kale chips. Kale has an astronomical amount of vitamin K which is the blood clotting vitamin. Take care when consuming kale if you are on blood thinners or are susceptible to blood clots.

Have you heard that kale is this years black? Actually this nutrient dense leafy green has been growing in popularity for the past decade. The health savvy and the hip have been onto kale for some years now because it’s a power house of nutrition like no other leafy green in the grocery store. Here’s some fresh content about kale from Jen Reviews https://www.jenreviews.com/kale/

Take a look at some of the cooked kale stats:

Nutrients in
Kale
1.00 cup cooked (130.00 grams)

 

Nutrient%Daily Value

 

 vitamin K1327.6%

 

 vitamin A354.1%

 

 vitamin C88.8%

 

 manganese27%

 

 fiber10.4%

 

 copper10%

 

 tryptophan9.3%

 

 calcium9.3%

 

 vitamin B69%

 

 potassium8.4%

 

 iron6.5%

kale_rawnora

 magnesium5.8%

 

 vitamin E5.5%

 

 omega-3 fats5.4%

 

 vitamin B25.2%

 

 protein4.9%

 

 vitamin B14.6%

 

 folate4.2%

 

 phosphorus3.6%

 

 vitamin B33.2%

 

Calories (36)2%

Keep in mind this is cooked kale. I don’t cook my kale, you lose too much goodness when you cook it. Blend it into a smoothie or massage with salt and eat it like a salad. It’s simple, just watch the video and then do it yourself… Keep it Live!

How To, Recipe

Miso Madness

Miso_reduce_cancer

It’s no secret that I’m a huge miso fan. I use miso in dressings, sauces and on almost daily basis in my almond miso spread. My preferred miso of choice is chickpea miso either from South River Miso or Miso Master. Both brands are organic and GMO-free. When shopping for miso, look for it in the refrigerated foods section of the health food store. Your average grocery store will not have miso unless it’s an Asian market. Miso seems to be a food item only appreciated by those with an Asian upbringing or those aware of the importance of fermented foods.

Chickpea_Miso

Miso is my favorite of all the ferments because of its flavor, functionality and superfood status. Miso is a fermented bean paste that most people are familiar with in the form of miso soup. The soup, being made with boiling water is unfortunately dead. There’s no need to kill your miso in the process of making soup. Especially considering the time invested in making this living food which is anywhere from 3 months to 3 years. Heating water to 150F and allowing it to cool will make soup that is warm and alive. Miso has many endearing qualities. For starters it takes an indigestible protein source – beans, legumes and pulses – and makes them digestible. The bean most commonly used to produce miso is soybean. Because of GMO (genetically modified organisms) concerns, one must be sure to purchase organic miso products to insure that you are not consuming a food containing genetically modified ingredients. I am a fan of chickpea miso, which has no soy in it at all. Miso must be unpasteurized to retain its health benefits. Miso powders are not a substitute to vibrant living unpasteurized miso paste. Miso has a hearty salty flavor with earthy undertones that are dependent on the ingredients used to make it. Dark misos are heartier and make wonderful additions to savory recipes while light misos are salty and slightly sweet allowing them to be used in milder creations.

In Asian countries like China, Korea and Japan; miso and fermented vegetables are a traditional daily staple. In some households they are served with every meal.

South_River_MisoMiso contains Lactobacillus like other friendly ferments. This probitoic has been shown to protect against E. Coli, Salmonella and Shigella. Another beneficial characteristic of unpasteurized miso is its ability to detox heavy metals and radiation from the body. Miso is a enzyme rich, protein dominant food containing all the essential amino acids. Miso contains omega-3 fats as well as lecithin, which is an emulsifier. This combination allows miso to balance cholesterol in the body. Miso is also a great source of calcium and B vitamins. Its salty taste allows you to use it in place of salt in many recipes.

Enjoy this miso marinade recipe and video. I hope you can join me at one of our upcoming retreats and Camp Rawnora in Michigan. The marinated asparagus is sure to be delicious. Keep it Live!

Wild Asparagus
Wild Asparagus

 

 

Simple Miso Marinade

Ingredients

  • 3 T Miso
  • ¼ C lemon juice
  • ¼ C olive oil
  • 2 t palm sugar or agave
  • 1 t tamari
  • 1 clove garlic – pressed

Instructions

  1. Blend all ingredients together.
  2. Use this marinade on mushrooms and veggies.
  3. Place items to be marinated in a sealable container and cover.
  4. Seal container and shake vigorously.
  5. Refrigerate if you plan on marinating for more than 2 hours.
http://www.livefoodexperience.com/2013/04/miso-madness/